Renault Megane RS

Renault-Megane_RS_2010

Renault-Megane_RS_2010

As the latest in a long line of Renault sporting models, Renault Mégane RS stands out through its exhilarating performance and handling. The cocktail of its 250hp engine, unmistakable sporting coupé credentials and choice of two chassis (‘Sport’ and ‘Cup’ with limited slip differential) is clear evidence that Renault Mégane RS has been honed to offer an extreme ride.

Coming after Mégane F1 Team R26 and Mégane R26.R, Renault Mégane RS profits fully from Renault Sport Technologies’ extensive experience when it comes to manufacturing production sporting models.

Powerful

New Mégane Renault Sport is powered by a new-generation 2-litre 16-valve turbocharged petrol engine which boasts maximum power of 250hp (184kW) at 5,500rpm and peak torque of 340Nm from 3,000rpm. The sum of the different improvements made to this engine has produced a gain of 20hp and 40Nm over Mégane R26.R which itself emerged as the yardstick in the world of performance hatches. The Renault Sport 2.0 T engine’s twin-scroll turbo is exceptionally responsive and is particularly flexible at lows revs, with 80 per cent of maximum torque available from 1,900 rpm. Its broad useful rev band makes it a genuine joy to drive in everyday use, and the pleasure remains all the way up to the rev-limiter whenever it is pushed a little harder. The engine of New Mégane RS drives through a six-speed manual gearbox.

Work has also gone into the acoustics of the Renault Sport 2.0 T engine to produce a telltale sporty pitch audible inside the cabin under acceleration.

Efficient

Renault Mégane RS has inherited the same suspension arrangement as the current Mégane RS. Thanks to an independent steering axis layout at the front, the suspension and steering functions have been separated to ensure a particularly high standard of handling and traction performance.

Like the sporting versions of the Renault Clio and Renault Twingo ranges, New Mégane RS is available with a choice of two chassis: the ‘Sport’ chassis or the ‘Cup’ chassis, which comes with a limited slip differential for even greater traction.

The electric power steering features specific, sportier calibration and benefits from the latest improvements seen on new Renault Mégane aimed at achieving greater precision and even more feedback from the road.

Renault Mégane RS is equipped with ESC which is fully disconnectable in order to enable owners to sample the pleasure of enjoying their car’s full potential round a circuit.

Provocative

New Mégane RS benefits from undeniably sporty looks. The front bumper incorporates the LED daytime running lights, as well as the splitter which recalls the low-slung nose of the R28 Formula 1 car. The sporty calling of this Renault Sport-badged model is further emphasized by its 18-inch aluminium alloy rims, central exhaust tailpipe and rear diffuser.

The interior appointments, too, exude the world of motor sport, from the extra lateral support for the seats, to the analogue rev-counter with visual and audible gearshift indicator, the aluminium pedal cover and the specific steering wheel complete with thumb rests. The Renault Sport signature is also visible inside the car: on the headrests, rev-counter background and dashboard.

Renault Mégane RS profits fully from Renault Sport Technologies’ extensive experience when it comes to manufacturing production sporting models

Renault Sport Technologies has combined its experience of motor sport with its longstanding production expertise to develop a comprehensive range of sporting cars. The hallmarks of Renault Sport models are their pedigree engines and efficient chassis which together deliver an undeniably high level of sports performance, as testified by the reputation forged by Mégane F1 Team R26 and Mégane R26.R which were voted ‘Sporting Car of the Year’ in France in 2007 and 2008 respectively.

Advertisements

Renault unveils limited edition World Series Clio and Megane

renaultWith temperatures soaring already at Renault’s spectacular World Series at Silverstone last weekend, the French auto giant unveiled even hotter limited editions of their two hot hatches, the Clio and the Megane. Called the World Series special editions, these three cars (one Clio and two Meganes) with a lot of stylish go-faster bits lit up the 5.14km long circuit in front of a 100,000 strong crowd of spectators who had come to watch a thrilling weekend of action-packed racing that even included the 500hp Formula Renault 3.5 cars.

The three World Series versions are based on the most popular Dynamique trim level in the Clio, Megane Hatch and Coupe ranges, and add extra equipment with great cost savings for the customers. The Clio World Series builds on the already sporty Dynamique trim and adds an extended front spoiler, side skirts, a sporty bumper along with some WSR badging. As for the engine, Renault is offering an option between the 1.2-litre 16V 75 engine, the highly efficient 1.2-litre TCe 100, or the extremely frugal 1.5-litre dCi 86 engines.

The Megane Hatch World Series too is based on the Dynamique trim and this five-door car sports an extended front spoiler, Coupe-style bumper inserts, side skirts, sporty rear bumper, rear spoiler and 17-inch alloy wheels. All this garnished with an adornment of WRS badging. Engine options of the Megane Hatch World Series include the 1.6-litre 16V 110 with variable valve timing or the 1.5-litre dCi 106, both coupled with a six-speed gearbox. Rounding off the World Series range is the Megane Coupe World Series that adds to the sleek design of the standard car with an extended front spoiler, side skirts, sports rear bumper and 17″ alloy wheels.

Renault Clio Turbo 100

renault-clio-rsThe figures alone can’t convey the strength and flexibility on tap. Maximum torque arrives at 3,000rpm, but it feels as though it’s available between 2,000rpm and 5,500rpm. And the benefit of the small capacity is that potent performance is backed up by impressive fuel economy and CO2 emissions. So, despite offering 27bhp less than the naturally aspirated 1.6-litre in the GT, this model is more fun to drive. And if beefed-up looks are essential, there’s the optional Sport Body Kit.

Soft suspension settings give the Clio a supple ride, but thanks to its excellent chassis, it will still dive into corners with enthusiasm. Our only niggle is with the overly assisted steering. It’s perfect for manoeuvring in town, but refuses to self-centre and feels numb in your hands.

Yet the Clio is still a class act. The refreshed styling will keep customers interested until the end of its production run, while cabin quality is improved. This is a car that punches well above its weight when it comes to refinement and performance.

2009 Renault Kangoo Be-Bop

Renault_Kangoo_5

If the Renault Avantime wasn’t proof enough that the French like quirky minivans, here’s further evidence: the 2009 Renault Kangoo Be-Bop, which premieres at this week’s Paris motor show.
Reportedly inspired by the Kangoo Compact concept shown at the 2007 Frankfurt motor show, the Be-Bop is, oddly enough, a compact Kangoo.  Renault’s seen fit to hack the center section (including both sliding side doors) away from the vehicle.  The result is a very tall two-door hatchback, which rides upon a very short wheelbase.
Though removing space seemingly defeats the point of a minivan, Renault’s replaced versatility with some funky tricks.  Sure, the contrasting colors on the hood and hatch (another conceptual cue) are interesting, but perhaps most so is the roof.  While the driver has a pop-up sunroof, the rear passengers have the option of an open-air experience.  Drop the rear window into the gate, and slide the rear moonroof forward, et voilà: a convertible of sorts.
Clever – and it does take us back to the Suzuki Sidekicks of days-gone, sans the quasi-off-road capability.  Still, we’re wondering why, apart from the roof gimmick, why someone would choose one over a similar (and more conventional) Clio hatchback.  Look at it this way: would you buy a two-door convertible Mazda5 when you could just as soon purchase a Mazda3 with a sunroof?  We didn’t think so.

If the Renault Avantime wasn’t proof enough that the French like quirky minivans, here’s further evidence: the 2009 Renault Kangoo Be-Bop, which premieres at this week’s Paris motor show.

Reportedly inspired by the Kangoo Compact concept shown at the 2007 Frankfurt motor show, the Be-Bop is, oddly enough, a compact Kangoo.  Renault’s seen fit to hack the center section (including both sliding side doors) away from the vehicle.  The result is a very tall two-door hatchback, which rides upon a very short wheelbase.

Though removing space seemingly defeats the point of a minivan, Renault’s replaced versatility with some funky tricks.  Sure, the contrasting colors on the hood and hatch (another conceptual cue) are interesting, but perhaps most so is the roof.  While the driver has a pop-up sunroof, the rear passengers have the option of an open-air experience.  Drop the rear window into the gate, and slide the rear moonroof forward, et voilà: a convertible of sorts.

Clever – and it does take us back to the Suzuki Sidekicks of days-gone, sans the quasi-off-road capability.  Still, we’re wondering why, apart from the roof gimmick, why someone would choose one over a similar (and more conventional) Clio hatchback.  Look at it this way: would you buy a two-door convertible Mazda5 when you could just as soon purchase a Mazda3 with a sunroof?  We didn’t think so.

China bans Renault on grounds of safety? China bans Renault!?

the-renault-megane-has-been-banned-from-import-into-china-for-safety-r

This morning, Automotive News reported that China’s quality inspection agency has banned the import of several Renault models for what it calls “serious safety risks.” Is this the twilight zone?
I had to look at the calendar to see if today was actually April Fool’s day. It’s not. So apparently, this is real. Get this — the Chinese General Administration of Quality Supervision Inspection and Quarantine said:
“In recent import inspections, we have repeately found batches of passenger vehicles made by the French Renault… do not conform with our country’s mandatory standards and relevant technical regulations, and there are serious safety risks.”
Renault, not surprisingly, said something along the lines of “ooh-la-la… quelle surprise!” but what they obviously wanted to say was “are you kidding me?”
Safety standards? In China? Come on. I’m thrilled that the Chinese auto market is growing so quickly, but I’m horrified by the country’s general lack of regard for safety. [Remember the Brilliance models that the German ADAC crash tested?] And now they’re banning the import of the Renault Laguna, Scenic, Megane, and Megane CC for not conforming to their safety standards? Why, because they’re too safe?
I’m sorry to sound like a skeptic, but this sounds like there’s a whole lot more going on here. This just reeks of government interference for reasons other than the safety of its citizens. Someone needs to figure out what’s really going on here.
This morning, Automotive News reported that China’s quality inspection agency has banned the import of several Renault models for what it calls “serious safety risks.” Is this the twilight zone?
I had to look at the calendar to see if today was actually April Fool’s day. It’s not. So apparently, this is real. Get this — the Chinese General Administration of Quality Supervision Inspection and Quarantine said:
“In recent import inspections, we have repeately found batches of passenger vehicles made by the French Renault… do not conform with our country’s mandatory standards and relevant technical regulations, and there are serious safety risks.”
Renault, not surprisingly, said something along the lines of “ooh-la-la… quelle surprise!” but what they obviously wanted to say was “are you kidding me?”
Safety standards? In China? Come on. I’m thrilled that the Chinese auto market is growing so quickly, but I’m horrified by the country’s general lack of regard for safety. [Remember the Brilliance models that the German ADAC crash tested?] And now they’re banning the import of the Renault Laguna, Scenic, Megane, and Megane CC for not conforming to their safety standards? Why, because they’re too safe?
I’m sorry to sound like a skeptic, but this sounds like there’s a whole lot more going on here. This just reeks of government interference for reasons other than the safety of its citizens. Someone needs to figure out what’s really going on here.