Bugatti Royale Super Saloon

super-saloon-built-b_460x0w

Bugatti’s new supercar as you know is a four-door super saloon which is currently known as Royale or Bordeaux. There are some speculations about this ultimate sedan and frankly none of them seem to be precise! It was supposed to make debut at the upcoming Frankfurt Motor Show, or at least the media thought it would! but as it turned out we won’t catch a glimpse of it any time soon.
However, that didn’t stop artists from drawing their own version of the car! As you see here this rendering is based on the last teaser shot of the Royale (or Bordeaux or whatever you call it!) with six exhaust pipes and that magnificent vertical brake light. The front-end of the car still remains a mystery.
CAR, believes that the Royale will be shown to a number of prospective customers later this summer, and we can expect it to go on sale in limited numbers in around 2012.

Bugatti’s new supercar as you know is a four-door super saloon which is currently known as Royale or Bordeaux. There are some speculations about this ultimate sedan and frankly none of them seem to be precise! It was supposed to make debut at the upcoming Frankfurt Motor Show, or at least the media thought it would! but as it turned out we won’t catch a glimpse of it any time soon.

However, that didn’t stop artists from drawing their own version of the car! As you see here this rendering is based on the last teaser shot of the Royale (or Bordeaux or whatever you call it!) with six exhaust pipes and that magnificent vertical brake light. The front-end of the car still remains a mystery.

CAR, believes that the Royale will be shown to a number of prospective customers later this summer, and we can expect it to go on sale in limited numbers in around 2012.

Advertisements

veyron linea vincero bugatti concept

Mansory Bugatti Veyron Linea Vincero Concept Car 2For this year’s Auto Salon in Geneva the German tuners from Mansory tried to prove what the finest car in the world is capable of. And they came out with this special edition Bugatti Veyron LINEA Vincerò that you can easily consider the craziest or the most exotic drive in the world.
This modded Bugatti can be described in just one word– unreal. It’s powered by an 8.0L 16-cylinder engine capable of 1109 horsepower and 1310 Nm of torque. We’re pretty sure that gives it a top speed somewhere between Ludicrous and Warp speeds. Visually, this baby is all Bugatti, but upgraded with fine fashionings that help put this Veyron mod into the multiple seven figures. The aggressive attitude is only enhanced by a gleaming, polished aluminum body work. Ignoring the fact that it will cost some millions and that only three of these will be built.

Bugatti Stratos Concept

Bugatti-Stratos-by-Bruno-Delusso-thumb-550x384-19946The Bugatti Stratos is a slick design by France’s Bruno Delussu, who was inspired by classic cars such as the Bugatti Type 57, Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Mille Miglia and locomotive designs by Raymond Loewy. Delussu wasn’t so interested in the technical aspects of those vehicles, however. He designed the Stratos to be a purely fantastical car that leans on its looks.

And lean on its looks it can. The end result, as you can see, is pretty impressive, affecting a retro air that’s still undoubtedly futuristic.

French graphic designer Bruno Delusso didn’t want to be bothered with the engineering and mechanical issues that plague the average concept car – he just wanted to create something stunning. So by throwing production feasibility, drivetrain components and caution to the wind, he succeeded.

Inspired by the Bugatti Type 57, Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Mille Miglia and Raymond Loewy’s locomotive designs, Delusso rendered up this: the Bugatti Stratos. Aside from the rear window and grille, it’s difficult to peg the Stratos as anything more than futuristic, Photoshop-enhanced navel-gazing, but the design speaks for itself

View latest car news and latest car reviews visit carworld.eclassifinds.com

2010 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport

bugatti-veyron-grand-sport-picturesLast year’s Pebble Beach Concours d’ Elegance in California was the setting for the very beginning world demonstration of the freshly Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport. The reaction was super positive and today production of this roadster – restricted to 150 units – is to begin at Molsheim. Concurrently, the media and clients are calling for their first test drives.

The new Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport confronted the marque renowned for impeccable automotive solutions, aesthetics and driving dynamics with a entirely fresh set of challenges. In reaction to client demand, important adjustments have followed arrived to the vehicle’s complex structure to enable open-top driving, thereby adding a fresh attribute to this superior sport car. Containing a host of new and advanced safety and equipment features, it’s the world’s fastest and most stimulating roadster. It’s instantly identifiable because of its slightly higher windscreen, stylized daytime running lights, and lightweight, transparent polycarbonate roof.

The primary challenge in development the new Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport with its removable roof resulted from the incomparable structure of the fixed-roof Bugatti Veyron. An optimal combination of rigidity and lightweight engineering secures the monocoque passenger cell of the original model is highly strong, while considering an absolute minimal. As the roof is an built-in part of the vehicle’s body structure, removing it meant the load paths had to be completely redesigned to maintain the vehicle’s rigidity and crash safety, and to extend extra security from side impacts and rolling.

As a final result, the monocoque structure back-number reinforced round the side skirts and the transmission tunnel. The B-pillars have been cross-stiffened using a carbon fibre support, and a central carbon plate has been positioned below the transmission tunnel to guarantee the vehicle suffers from lower torsional flexing than any other roadster.

The doors of the new Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport are constituted of carbon fibre, and house an integrated longitudinal beam. In the event of an accident, this transfers the load from the A to the B-pillar, thereby dispelling impact energy. Moreover, the 2 redesigned air intakes for the 16-cylinder mid-engine now feature 10-centimetre wide carbon-fibre elements to provide security in the consequence of a roll.

Along with moisture-resistant, backstitched leather, a range of new equipment features has been expanded the interior, including a reversing camera with 2.7-inch monitor integrated in the rear-view-mirror, and the “Puccini” sound system with digital signal processor.

When the roof is closed, the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport can reach 407 km/h, while speeds of up to 360 km/h are possible with the roof off. Should it rain, an innovative soft-top roof, like an umbrella, stored in the luggage compartment, can be opened up at any time. With this soft top in place, the car can travel at up to 160 km/h.
More than just an open Veyron

“When I had the chance to test-drive the new Grand Sport for the first time myself, I was filled with excitement”, said Pierre Henri Raphanel, Bugatti’s Pilot official, “as soon I shifted into second gear, I cognized this was a entirely another car. I could immediately feel the difference. Even with the roof still on, in the tips of my fingers and at the base of my spine everything was more present, more intimate. More precise with less understeer, almost as if you had taken away some filters from the suspension and the steering.” The former Le Mans winner has probably driven more kilometres in a Veyron than anyone else, presenting the car to a lot clients and the press. Taking off the roof “the excitement comes directly from the engine – giving you the feeling that you had a horsepower factory just thirty centimetres behind your head, trying to suck you up and swallow you,” he raves.

Assembled by hand at the company’s headquarters in Molsheim, Alsace, the Grand Sport will be delivered from July 2009 onwards at a price of 1.4 million euros (excluding taxes and transportation). Just 150 units will be made, with the first 50 of these going exclusively to registered Bugatti customers. So far 30 Grand Sports have been ordered. The Chassis Number one auctioned at the Pebble Beach Auction by Gooding and Company last summer and sold for 3.19 million Dollar. The additional revenues of 900.000 Dollar were donated by Bugatti to the Pebble Beach Company Foundation Charity.

Bugatti Veyron Review

Bugatti_Veyron

After twenty-three gruelling hours in a seriously packed economy class cabin, we arrived in Frankfurt via Abu Dhabi, ready for what we thought was a well earned luxury business class flight to Strasbourg in France.
Turns out, our double degree IT guru and fellow motoring journalist Alborz, (who said his friend at flight centre had it sorted), had completely misread the ticket. Bus – actually meant BUS – the road going version. All sorted?
By some stroke of luck though, the bus company had grossly overbooked both Strasbourg bound buses, and Bruno, the guy at the Lufthansa desk, worked some magic and presto, we had a Ford Mondeo TDCi for twenty-four hours, at no cost. Gold, we thought.
The diesel powered Mondeo is no slouch, within moments we are sitting on a comfortable 200km/h as we head towards Molsheim, the home of Bugatti.
It couldn’t have been more than twenty minutes into the trip and bugger, something felt badly out of whack with the front end. What we found, was a dirty great big hole in the middle of the right front tyre tread, which meant we weren’t going anywhere fast. That is, until we got the spare on and rebooted to that blissful 200km/h.
The look of disappointment on our faces, when we lifted the boot lining and saw that 125-width space saver, said it all. And it was a Sunday!Rather than push on at an impossible 80km/h (its downright dangerous on the Autobahns) we stopped in at Hertz in Heidelberg and switched over to a little Peugeot 307 1.6L diesel powered wagon, which believe it or not, was good for a steady 190km/h and that’s hauling the four of us, with a stack of luggage and camera equipment!
Alborz also forgot to download the Euro maps on our Mio Sat Nav and we were damn too tired to figure out the road map. Lots of stops to ask directions in my half decent French (the other’s will surely deny me that credit) eventually paid off.
Molsheim is not a big place, and when we saw the Bugatti sign inside a high security compound, smiles were a plenty. We were less than twelve hours away from an event, few in the world will ever claim.
After twenty-three gruelling hours in a seriously packed economy class cabin, we arrived in Frankfurt via Abu Dhabi, ready for what we thought was a well earned luxury business class flight to Strasbourg in France.
Turns out, our double degree IT guru and fellow motoring journalist Alborz, (who said his friend at flight centre had it sorted), had completely misread the ticket. Bus – actually meant BUS – the road going version. All sorted?
By some stroke of luck though, the bus company had grossly overbooked both Strasbourg bound buses, and Bruno, the guy at the Lufthansa desk, worked some magic and presto, we had a Ford Mondeo TDCi for twenty-four hours, at no cost. Gold, we thought.
The diesel powered Mondeo is no slouch, within moments we are sitting on a comfortable 200km/h as we head towards Molsheim, the home of Bugatti.
It couldn’t have been more than twenty minutes into the trip and bugger, something felt badly out of whack with the front end. What we found, was a dirty great big hole in the middle of the right front tyre tread, which meant we weren’t going anywhere fast. That is, until we got the spare on and rebooted to that blissful 200km/h.
The look of disappointment on our faces, when we lifted the boot lining and saw that 125-width space saver, said it all. And it was a Sunday!Rather than push on at an impossible 80km/h (its downright dangerous on the Autobahns) we stopped in at Hertz in Heidelberg and switched over to a little Peugeot 307 1.6L diesel powered wagon, which believe it or not, was good for a steady 190km/h and that’s hauling the four of us, with a stack of luggage and camera equipment!
Alborz also forgot to download the Euro maps on our Mio Sat Nav and we were damn too tired to figure out the road map. Lots of stops to ask directions in my half decent French (the other’s will surely deny me that credit) eventually paid off.
Molsheim is not a big place, and when we saw the Bugatti sign inside a high security compound, smiles were a plenty. We were less than twelve hours away from an event, few in the world will ever claim.