2010 Lotus Evora Type 124 Endurance Racecar

Lotus-Evora_Type_124_Endurance_Racecar_2010

Lotus-Evora_Type_124_Endurance_Racecar_2010

The Lotus Evora Type 124 Endurance Racecar has been developed from the award-winning Lotus Evora road car and is built to FIA regulations and safety standards.

The Lotus Evora Type 124 Endurance Racecar is the next step in the evolution of the Evora. The car will make its 24 hour racing debut at the ADAC Nürburgring 24 Hours which provides a great test for the Evora’s performance, efficiency and durability under tough and demanding endurance race conditions.

At the heart of the Lotus Evora are fundamental racecar elements: mid-engine layout, high-tech and super-stiff extruded and bonded aluminium chassis and very strong lightweight forged aluminium wishbones. All these elements mean that it is a natural evolution from the road going Lotus Evora to a competitive endurance racecar.

From the outset the design team had intentions to take the Evora racing and the chassis was designed with this in mind. Endurance races are the perfect events to showcase the efficiency, handling and durability characteristics that have been fundamental to the concept of the Evora.

The Lotus Evora Type 124 Endurance Racecar has a race-tuned version of the mid-mounted Toyota V6 engine, with power increased to over 400 ps (depending on race regulations). Vehicle mass is expected to be reduced by up to 200 kg, bringing the weight of the racecar to less than 1200 kg (depending on race regulations).

Further changes for the Lotus Evora Type 124 Endurance Racecar include a six speed sequential paddle shift racing gearbox, full FIA specification roll cage, FIA-compliant 120 litre ATL fuel system, FIA fire extinguisher system, competition carbon fibre rear wing, diffuser and front splitter.

The racecar is fitted with AP Racing 6 piston callipers front and rear, with a race-tuned Bosch ABS system, 4-way adjustable dampers and adjustable anti-roll bars. The racecar runs on 18″ rims shod with Pirelli racing slicks and the wheels widths have been increased over the roadcar to 9 ½ J on the front and 11 J on the rear.

The aerodynamically efficient Lotus Evora Type 124 Endurance Racecar body design, made from lightweight composite and carbon fibre panels, remains predominantly unchanged from the road car, with the only modifications being to the lower sections of the front and rear clamshells and the side sills.

Luke Bennett, Director of Lotus Cars Limited, said, “Motorsport has been in our blood ever since our founder, Colin Chapman, built the first Lotus back in 1948. We are proud of our motorsport history, which includes victories in Formula One, Le Mans, saloon car, rally car and sportscar racing around the world; more recently, we won the British GT3 Championship in 2006 with the Lotus Exige. The Lotus Evora Type 124 Endurance Racecar is from the same unique stable and we expect it to be a competitive racecar when we enter various endurance races next year.”

Roger Becker, Vehicle Engineering Director for Group Lotus Plc said, “Every Lotus car is designed to be at home on the race track as well as the road, and the Evora is no different. Designed primarily as an everyday road car, the Evora’s lightweight and stiff structure, its aerodynamics and performance means that it is perfectly suited to taming race tracks around the world, and we are looking forward to seeing the new Lotus Evora Type 124 Endurance Racecar line up on the grid for the 2010 season.”

The racecar is expected to compete in a number of endurance races in 2010/2011 forming part of a factory-supported race program. The races that are targeted are: The 2010 ADAC Nürburgring 24 Hours (Nürburgring Nordschleife, Germany) in May 2010, Merdeka Millennium 12 Hours (Sepang, Malaysia) in August 2010, BritCar 24 Hours (Silverstone, UK) in October 2010 and the Dubai 24 Hours (Dubai Autodrome, UAE) January 2011.

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2010 Lotus Elise Club Racer

Lotus Elise Club Racer

Lotus Elise Club Racer

Making its debut at the 2009 IAA in Frankfurt, the Special Edition Lotus Elise Club Racer introduces new and exclusive colour schemes, bespoke interior and lightweight components all in a world class, high performance and low emission sportscar.

Lotus has taken four of the classic colour schemes used by Lotus in the 1960s (Elite Yellow, Carbon Grey, Sky Blue and Old English White) and combined them with exclusive Club Racer interior design features to give a stunning sportscar that beautifully morphs function and form.

The firm and supportive Lotus Elise seats are clad with lightweight microfibre comfort pads perfectly positioned to give the right amount of support with the minimal amount of weight, but still keeping the body coloured seat shell partly exposed.

The exterior body colour theme is carried over to the transmission tunnel and combined with silver and black paint highlights, bisecting the cockpit and tying together the whole sporty theme unique to the Lotus Elise Club Racer.

Other exclusive interior design features of the Lotus Elise Club Racer are the anthracite anodised gear knob and handbrake sleeve, the Club Racer (CR) logo hand embroidered on the seat headrest and the unique anodized aluminium flooring in the driver’s and passenger’s footwell. The small 320 mm diameter leather rimmed steering wheel has an on-center marker, enabling the more spirited driver to quickly and safely identify the straight ahead position of the front wheels.

The lightweight six spoke alloy wheels, shod in bespoke Yokohama AD07 LTS tyres are also anthracite anodised, complementing the key interior components.

Luke Bennett, Director of Lotus Cars said, “Special Editions of the award winning Lotus Elise have always proved popular with our customers around the world, and I expect the Lotus Elise Club Racer to be no different. We have taken colour schemes from our past, used on the Elite and Elan in the 1960s and cleverly brought them up to date with a modern feel to the interior. The whole design package is modern with a classic twist, which of course matches the peerless ride and handling of a Lotus and the convertible experience of the Elise perfectly.”

2010 Lotus Exige S / Exige S 260 Sport

Lotus_Exige_SLotus’s stand at the 2009 Geneva auto show featured the latest evolution of the company’s hard-core Exige S, which can only be described as, well, harder-core. The exterior begins to tell the story with its more angular front clip, full-width chin splitter, and elevated rear wing. The aesthetic changes aim to better manage airflow over the car, with the front fascia improving radiator cooling and the revised rear spoiler reducing aerodynamic drag without compromising downforce.

Little has changed within the Exige’s intensely focused driving environment, but in a seemingly never-ending march towards more power, the Toyota-sourced 1.8-liter supercharged four-cylinder now develops up to 257 hp in the limited-edition Exige S 260 Sport. The standard Exige S is rated at a still-impressive 240 hp, up significantly from the 190 naturally aspirated horses the car packed when it debuted in the U.S. in late 2005.

For 2010, the Exige line also incorporates a new, driver-programmable launch control system (derived from the company’s GT3 racing program), which features adjustable traction-control programming that allows for between zero and seven percent tire slip (or can be completely turned off, of course). Cool.

2010 Lotus Evora

lotus_evora

lotus_evora

The Lotus Evora, unveiled at the British International Motor Show, represents an evolution for Lotus in the manufacture of exciting lightweight British sports cars. The Lotus Evora, greenlighted for production and a release in summer of 2009, has sports car fans worldwide marveling at its beautiful design and thrilling new technology.

The Lotus Evora is the first unveiling of several new sports car models coming from Group Lotus, known in recent years predominantly as the masters of the Lotus Elise and Exige series. True British sports cars that are unlike any other on the track while retaining some streetability, the Lotus Elise and Exige are criticized for being too harsh for most sports car enthusiasts. As daily drivers, Lotus’ current offerings appeal to only the most hardcore “driver’s car” types.

The Evora is a different breed of sports car from Lotus, to be sure. Employing a 2+2 seating design–though it should be said that the rear seat is toddler territory only–and with an interior full of ammenities, the Lotus Evora is a livable super lightweight sports car, that should carry over Lotus’ famous driving dynamics as well.

The Evora interior continues the total package of offering a hardcore British traditional sports car experience in a package that can still be driven to work every day. With tasteful leather and metal accents on every surface, the Lotus Evora interior is more luxury, less track racer. As a total package sports car slotted above the Lotus Elise and Exige, the Evora’s interior will comfortably accomodate adults up to 6 ft. 5 inches tall, Lotus says.

From the Group Lotus official news release, presented in its entirity below:

“Unlike recent Lotus products that use a race car inspired, technical minimalism, the Evora employs a softer approach that utilises premium quality materials and finishes to create a contemporary but luxurious ambience that is unique to Lotus products.”

The Evora’s base price? No word from Lotus yet, remember that this car won’t be available in showrooms for another year. As the Evora is considerably upmarket from the hardcore Elise, figure a base price of greater than $60,000 but considerably less than $100,000.

All the Evora details are presented below, hot off the presses direct from Lotus.

With its stunning visual impact, exhilarating all-round dynamic performance, innovative chassis technology and high levels of luxury, packaging and convenience, the Evora heralds an exciting new era for Lotus.

[Courtesy Group Lotus News Release]

The first all-new Lotus since the iconic Elise made its debut in 1995, The Evora enters the sports car market as currently the world’s only mid-engined 2+2. Powered by a Lotus-tuned 3.5-litre V6 engine producing 280 PS, and weighing just 1350 kg (prototype specification), the Evora promises breathtaking performance. During preliminary testing around the famous Nürburgring, the Lotus chassis engineers report that it is extremely agile and great fun to drive – even when clad with the full development disguise that hid the beautiful lines from the prying motor-industry paparazzi.

In addition to its excellent performance and exemplary handling, the Evora offers a more refined ownership experience than Lotus’s existing smaller four-cylinder models. Its elegantly styled cabin is elegantly trimmed and its equipment list includes contemporary features such as an advanced touch-screen multi-media system and electric power-fold door mirrors.

Because one of the roles of the Evora is to attract new customers to the Lotus brand, much attention has been paid to its ease of use. Wider, taller door apertures and narrower sills make getting in and out of the cabin a less athletic undertaking than it is in Lotus’s smaller sports cars (the Elise, Exige, Europa and 2-Eleven), while the design of the cabin itself will accommodate two 99th percentile (6ft 5in tall) American males in the front seats.

The ‘convenience factor’ of the Evora extends to less obvious areas of the car. For instance, beneath the skin the entire front-end structure is a high tech aluminium sacrificial modular unit, attached to the main extruded aluminium tub. This modular unit is designed to deform for maximum safety, and to reduce repair costs in the event of a frontal impact.

The Evora has been designed with global automotive regulations in mind, and future derivatives are planed, these including amongst others, a convertible.

The Evora will be hand crafted and built on a dedicated new assembly line within Lotus’s advanced manufacturing facility at Hethel in the east of England; capacity limitations will restrict production to approximately 2000 cars a year, ensuring the dynamic new sports car’s rarity and exclusivity.

Mike Kimberley, CEO of Group Lotus plc, has this to say about the exciting new model: “The Evora is the biggest milestone Lotus has achieved since the Elise was born 13 years ago and is part of our bold five year strategic plan, which includes the introduction of new cars and technologies to many more markets around the world. The Evora also represents Lotus core values of performance through light weight and efficiency and proves that you can have phenomenal performance, fuel efficiency elegant design and practicality all in a class leading mid-engine 2+2 sportscar, which will meet global safety and homologation standards”

Mike Kimberley continues, “Looking to the future, we will continue to research, develop and produce lighter, more efficient vehicles which are linked to our extensive and well-regarded work on all aspects of future fuels, alternative engines and electric and hybrid vehicle solutions for the future. We all have an environmental responsibility to future generations and the Evora is another example where Lotus is seen to make significant steps towards improving the efficiency and sustainability of the motorcar keeping Britain at the forefront of the high technology motor industry.”

THE EVORA IN DETAIL

Style or function? Have both…

Designed ‘in-house’ by Lotus Design, the sleek and athletic form uses fluid forms and crisp surfaces to communicate velocity, agility and sophistication. Low and wide with modern cab forward proportions, muscular rear haunches and function optimised hip air intakes this is clearly a serious mid engined sportscar that skilfully hides the practicality of its two plus two capability.

Russell Carr, Head of Lotus Design, led the Evora’s design team with Steven Crijns, Design Manager responsible for the exterior and Anthony Bushell, Senior Designer, responsible for the interior.

“A cornerstone of the design’s success was working closely with the technical team to develop a package that allowed us to get the proportions correct,” says Head of Design Russell Carr, “The asymmetric wheel sizes, the short rear overhang, long front overhang and cab forward visor screen all contribute to giving the car visual movement and an agile stance. This is incredibly important to us because we want the car’s aesthetics to communicate its driving characteristics”.

Lotus products have always embodied a perfect balance between form and function and the Evora successfully continues this heritage. “We never lost sight of the fact that, although this car must provide real world useability, sportscars are emotional purchases and that you have to seduce the customer through beguiling looks and exotic persona. We are, therefore, very proud that we have been able to use technical and user functionality to positively drive the design in key areas and create some of the car’s most distinctive features”. says Carr.

Ingress and egress, for example, dictated a minimal “step-over” to get into the Evora. We simply cut away the surface under the door and created a unique and dramatic piece of sculpture that enhances the stance of the car as well as its useability.

Elsewhere, aerodynamic considerations for drag, down force and cooling had significant but positive influence on the overall form and details such as air intakes. A desire to create balanced down force, that increases cornering performance, led to the adoption of, the now, “signature” top exit radiator vent, race car inspired diffuser and “floating rear wing”. Drag limitation, drove the dramatic tear-dropped cabin layout and the curvaceous plan view has given the car a more muscular rear shoulder and conveys a level of sophistication appropriate to this market segment.

“We believe that our designs should be honest as well as dramatic and so we are really pleased with the fact that these iconic features all do a real job” says Steven Crijns, Design Manager.

This inherent understanding of the relationship between the technical and the aesthetic paid dividends the first time a full-scale model of the Evora was wind-tunnel tested – only minimal adjustments were required to the car’s aerodynamic package to meet the targets for downforce and stability.

Steve Crijns continued, “Overall the design language shows a clear DNA link with its Lotus siblings, whilst establishing its own distinctive and contemporary theme. The undulating shoulder line is brilliantly mirrored in the lower part of the bodyside by the cut -away sill that creates a torseau-like muscularity.”

“The front three-quarter view is really powerful” Russell Carr continues, “Your eye is drawn effortlessly, from our signature mouth, rearward by fluid surfaces and fast lines that create a sense of speed even when the car is stationary. From this angle you can also see how dramatically the visor screen sweeps around the teardrop form of the cabin and the gently waisted plan shape perfectly accentuates the muscularity of the rear fender. This is unmistakeably mid engined language and the Evora is unmistakeably a Lotus.”

The view from the rear three-quarters is just as striking and the one that many will become familiar with as the car passes them on the road. The tapered cabin, diffuser, floating wing, centrally mounted twin tailpipes and distinctive engine bay vents all combine to create a completely unique look.

Moving right inside…

The design language of the interior reflects that of the exterior – simple, fluid surfaces, soft forms and crisp feature lines wrap around the cabin cosseting the occupants. Unlike recent Lotus products that use a race car inspired, technical minimalism, the Evora employs a softer approach that utilises premium quality materials and finishes to create a contemporary but luxurious ambience that is unique to Lotus products.

It is, according to Head of Lotus Design Russell Carr, “A huge departure from what people might expect based on Lotus’s recent past. We wanted the Evora’s cabin to feel special and to be surprising as well as sporty. Precision engineered metal inserts and quality edge-lit switches are brilliantly juxtaposed against soft hand-stitched leather surfaces to give a modern interior with a classic twist.”

Russell Carr continues, “The flat bottomed steering wheel, figure hugging sports seat, contemporary instrumentation and ergonomically positioned controls provide an intuitive environment that instantly forms a connection between driver and car ensuring that it becomes an extension of his or her body.”

Anthony Bushell Senior Designer explained about the choice of materials in the Evora’s interior, “Tactile quality is incredibly important within this segment and so we wanted the interior to use honest premium materials. Much of the switchgear is bespoke, and every metallic component is actually metal.”

Focused courtesy lighting is used throughout the interior, giving a spectacular illuminated feel to the sculpture design feature of the cabin. The extensive use of handcrafted, premium leather differentiates The Evora from other Lotus products and such is its importance to the character of the car that an entire new trim shop has been built at the Lotus Headquarters in the UK, dedicated to its production.

Even the entry level versions of the Evora will feature leather-upholstered seats, upper door trim panels and facia, but it is expected that most customers will opt for the full hide treatment. With a range of leather colours available, customers will have the opportunity to personalise their Evora.

High-tech treats

Contemporary technology also features in the Evora’s cabin. A newly developed Alpine multi-media system with a 7 inch touch-screen provides advanced audio, satellite navigation, video, Bluetooth® hands-free telephone and iPod® connectivity functions; the screen also serves as a monitor for The Evora’s optional reversing camera. The satellite navigation element of the system is removable, allowing you to programme it from the comfort of your home, or take it with you to continue your journey in an unfamiliar pedestrian location.

The Alpine audio set-up is one of the most sophisticated automotive systems in the world. Called IMPRINT and using MultEQ sound enhancement technology, it is able to cancel out sound imbalances, caused by the cabin window glass, for instance, creating echoes, while carpets suppress mid-range frequencies – resulting in amazingly crisp, clear, undistorted sound reproduction wherever you are seated in the car.

A bespoke air-conditioning system developed by Bergstrom is standard on all models, and has been designed for the hottest climate or the closest humidity to help provide maximum occupant comfort. Lotus traction control and on-board tyre pressure monitoring will also be available.

One size fits all

The front seats themselves are very supportive and leather clad with a lightweight manual adjustment mechanism for fore and aft, rake and lumbar, designed to give a supported driving position.

The rear seats of 2+2 versions of the Evora -are intended for children and smaller adults. There will also be a two-seater derivative with a luggage shelf in the back. To maximise comfort in the rear, there’s a decent amount of foot-room under the seats in front, while both back seats feature ISOFIX mountings for secure child seat fitment.

When unoccupied, the rear seats provide a convenient stowage area, adding to the Evora’s appeal as an everyday car. The 160 litre boot, which ingeniously features a fresh air cooling system to reduce the effect of any heat ingress from the engine bay, will also accommodate a full set of golf clubs.

Easy in, easy out

With the Elise and its derivatives, the no-compromise character of the car makes getting in and out across a wide sill and through a comparatively narrow door/window aperture part of the charm of ownership. For the Evora and its remit for the serious daily driver, and to attract newcomers to the Lotus brand, greater convenience and practicality is provided.

As a consequence the sill is now lower and slimmer (80mm wide compared with 100mm in the Elise), and the whole door aperture taller. The doors open wider than on the Elise and its siblings, while the height of the front seat is raised by 65mm.

But while The Evora is undeniably more ‘lifestyle’ in respect of its everyday practicality, once you’re seated behind its flat-bottomed steering wheel, it feels every bit as exotic and sporting as you would expect a Lotus to be.

Safely does it

In common with the Elise and its derivatives, The Evora’s bonded extruded aluminium chassis tub has incredible inherent strength, particularly in regard to side impacts. Additional torsional strength is given to the whole structure by the tubular steel seatbelt anchorage frame that also acts as a rollover structure.

Deformable sacrificial aluminium front and steel rear subframe modules are attached to the tub using joints which are designed to minimise damage to the tub, protecting the main passenger cell in the event of an accident.

Driver and passenger airbags are standard. The airbag on the passenger side is cleverly engineered to deploy vertically and then be deflected rearwards by the windscreen, to provide protection for children as well as adults.

Anti-lock brakes are standard on all models, as is Lotus Traction Control (LTC); these systems have been specially developed in co-operation with Bosch and enable up and coming drivers to consistently exploit the braking and acceleration capabilities of the Evora, whilst allowing skilled enthusiasts the freedom to enjoy the full Lotus driving experience.

Lotus Exige S 2010

lotus exige s

lotus exige s

The 79th International Geneva Motor Show sees the introduction of the exciting new 2010 Model Year Lotus Exige S with a newly designed front end, a new rear wing and impressive emissions of just 199 g/km CO2.

The Lotus Exige is a renowned high performance coupe that has a well earned reputation of choice for drivers who demand uncompromised performance, both on the road and on the track.

Lotus has always pursued efficiency and fuel economy and for the 2010 Model Year Lotus Exige S, Lotus has reduced the emissions to only 199 g/km CO2 and increased the fuel economy to an impressive 8.5 litres/100 km on the Official European Combined Cycle and a frugal 6.5 litres/100 km on the Official European Extra Urban Cycle.

The 2010 Model Year also sees the introduction of a few key changes to the Exige to enhance the look and improve aerodynamic performance.

A restyled front end and new larger, rear wing that not only reduces drag, but also gives a more muscular stance enhancing the lightweight shrink-wrapped look of the whole car.

The composite rear wing is based on the design from the Exige GT3 road car concept shown at the Geneva Motorshow in 2007. Compared to the 2009 Model Year Exige tailgate mounted wing it is 181 mm wider and mounted 46 mm higher and 61 mm further back. It is attached to the rear bodyshell clam via rear end plates which not only increases the stiffness of the whole structure but also ensures that as much of the airflow as possible passes over the rear wing. This careful airflow management increases stability, reduces drag and, most importantly, maintains the impressive downforce figures of 42 kg at 160 km/h.

The restyled front end includes a larger, more angular air intake mouth to help funnel more air through the radiator, to improve the efficiency of the engine system. Ahead of the front wheels on either side of the main aperture, two larger air intakes increase the airflow to the twin oil coolers. Horizontal vanes bisect these oil cooler air-intakes to stabilise the airflow to further increase the cooling efficiency.

Since the Exige S2 was launched in 2004, the power has increased from 190 hp through 220 hp to 240 hp in standard road form – more for the track centric Exige Cup 260 – and the new larger air intakes improve engine cooling for these current higher powered Exige variants.

Mounted below the three new air intakes is a new aerodynamic splitter for the 2010 Model Year Exige. Made from a lightweight composite, the splitter is now extended to wrap around the whole of the front end and chiseled side lips are raised to deflect air around the tyres to reduce drag.

Mike Kimberley, Chief Executive of Group Lotus plc said, “Over the years, the Lotus Exige has developed a hardcore fan base around the world and its popularity has placed it as one of the legendary sportscars of the 21st century. So far, over 5000 Exiges have been hand-built at our high-tech manufacturing facility making it a significant contributor to our global production. The lightweight Exige has one of the highest specific power outputs of any globally emissions certified car and 133 hp per litre is a perfect demonstration of Colin Chapman’s philosophy of performance through light weight and of Lotus’ relentless pursuit of efficiency. The same technology that makes a lightweight car a high performer also makes it efficient – how many cars have performance figures of 0 – 100 km/h in 4.77 secs but produce only 199 g/km CO2?”

Like all Lotus cars, the functional components of the car are also beautifully designed as Russell Carr, Chief of Lotus Design, explains, “For 2010 we have taken the already visually extreme Exige and given it even more visual drama. The changes we have integrated into the front and rear of the Exige signal an even clearer and purposeful intent. The purposeful rear wing is race inspired, the new angular air intakes and full width splitter gives a more hard-edged and aggressive look. Overall, the Exige appears more planted and gives the illusion that both the front and rear of the car are wider than they really are without losing its agile and lithe character.”

Roger Becker, Director of Vehicle Engineering said, “The changes we have made to the Exige for 2010 Model Year are quite subtle when taken individually, but taken as a complete package they make significant improvements to aerodynamics and the overall look of the car. The Exige is a classic fit-for-purpose performance machine, the design tweaks we have made have reduced the drag, cleaned up the airflow around the front and rear of the car, whilst retaining the impressive balanced downforce figures, to give an exciting high performance drive.”

The specification of the highly successful 2009 Model Year Exige Cup 260, unveiled at the Paris Motorshow in 2008 remains unchanged.

Lotus Evora makes SoCal stop at Cars and Coffee

2010lotusevoras---01

Filed under: Coupes, Sports/GTs, Lotus, Misc. Auto Shows

While lucky Brits are already capable of walking into a Lotus dealership and driving off with a new midsize Evora of their very own, Americans still have to wait a bit longer. We’ve already shown you the 2010 Lotus Evora that was at the L.A. Auto Show, and we’ve given you info on the specs and options. We’ve even confirmed U.S. details for the most important numbers.

Although an official release date hasn’t been confirmed yet, we have heard that the magic moment will arrive early next year. Whether the Evora gets labeled as a 2010 or 2011 model remains up in the air, but we do know a lot of other info about this all-new model crafted by the magicians in Hethel. What we haven’t had until now are some real-world photos. That all changed over the weekend when a couple of test engineers stopped by for a spell at our favorite weekly Southern California car meet, Cars and Coffee. Read the rest of our first impression after the jump, and don’t forget to check out the gallery as well.

While lucky Brits are already capable of walking into a Lotus dealership and driving off with a new midsize Evora of their very own, Americans still have to wait a bit longer. We’ve already shown you the 2010 Lotus Evora that was at the L.A. Auto Show, and we’ve given you info on the specs and options. We’ve even confirmed U.S. details for the most important numbers.

Although an official release date hasn’t been confirmed yet, we have heard that the magic moment will arrive early next year. Whether the Evora gets labeled as a 2010 or 2011 model remains up in the air, but we do know a lot of other info about this all-new model crafted by the magicians in Hethel. What we haven’t had until now are some real-world photos. That all changed over the weekend when a couple of test engineers stopped by for a spell at our favorite weekly Southern California car meet, Cars and Coffee. Read the rest of our first impression after the jump, and don’t forget to check out the gallery as well.

Lotus Evora

lotus-evora-blog

I’ve just been reading a road test on the new Evora in “Winding Road” magazine. I was attracted by the photographs and I think it is the best looking Lotus to have been produced for ages. Much better than the Elise for example.
It too is powered by the Toyota 3.5litre transverse mounted V6 with the 6-speed manual gearbox. It has 39/61 fore/aft weight distribution and is apparently fantastic to drive, handling better than a Porsche Cayman for example. Torsional rigidity is also better than the Porsche as well. What does everybody else think of this little beauty?

I’ve just been reading a road test on the new Evora in “Winding Road” magazine. I was attracted by the photographs and I think it is the best looking Lotus to have been produced for ages. Much better than the Elise for example.

It too is powered by the Toyota 3.5litre transverse mounted V6 with the 6-speed manual gearbox. It has 39/61 fore/aft weight distribution and is apparently fantastic to drive, handling better than a Porsche Cayman for example. Torsional rigidity is also better than the Porsche as well. What does everybody else think of this little beauty?