Peugeot 207 RC (2010)

2010-Peugeot-207-1With its three body shapes, each bursting with appeal, the Peugeot 207 moved into the pole position in the European small car market in 2007 and then remained there in 2008 with sales of 423,700 units.

However, in the summer of 2009, the Peugeot 207 will become even more visually appealing due to the introduction of a number of new features, allowing it to:

* win new admirers with a more distinctive elegance but still maintaining a personality full of dynamism.
* attract previous and existing owners (1,460,000 207s were produced to the end of April 2009) who, once or even twice before, will have approved of its innovative profile and original styling which are well above average for the segment in day-to-day use to continue to win the hearts of its customers through its charm, its blend of comfort and driveability, its low running costs and high levels of standard equipment.

With the new 207, Peugeot, the European leader in the B2 segment in 2008, once again demonstrates its small car expertise. By the end of the first half of 2009 Peugeot will have completely modernised all its vehicles in this segment.

The Peugeot 107, the ideal urban car in the B1 segment, compact and easy to drive, was given a new design at the front in January 2009 that added a touch of class to its young and trendy image.

In March 2009, the Peugeot 206+ was introduced to continue the Peugeot 206 legend with a new goal: that of a versatile entry level vehicle in the B2 segment with proven qualities and a refreshingly modern design featuring all the current Peugeot styling cues.

Finally in July 2009, the Peugeot 207, the “star of the small car market” will finally see its appeal enhanced in three key ways:

Exterior Styling Changes

* a redesigned front combining natural dynamism with a softer visual look
* more body coloured surfaces and chrome detailing
* spectacular new rear lights using panels of luminescent diodes (hatchback and CC)

A more luxurious passenger compartment

* new trims and detailing placing emphasis on perceived quality, comfort and dynamism
* new instrument panel designs with a more modern look and visual appeal

An even greater commitment to reducing fuel consumption and protecting the environment

* thanks to particularly fuel efficient engines with reduced greenhouse gas emissions
* through the optimisation of the rolling resistance of the tyres to reduce fuel consumption
* through “very low fuel consumption” optimised not only aerodynamically (exceptional Cx of only 0.274), but also by operation of the engine itself and rolling resistance, allowing CO2 emissions to be reduced to 99 g/km
* through the gradual deployment of engines meeting the Euro5 emission standard
* through the introduction of a gear change indicator on manual gearbox engines encouraging the driver to drive in a more environmentally efficient way.

Introduction of new equipment enhancing both comfort and driving safety

* WIP Bluetooth system
* impulse direction indicators
* remote controlled window closure (hatchback and SW)
* one-touch operation of the driver’s electric window on the Peugeot 207 CC

The Peugeot 207 family, therefore, builds on its basic strengths: excellent primary, secondary and tertiary safety and innovative hi-tech equipment.

It also reaffirms its distinctive appeal in each of its different body shapes:

* The Peugeot 207 hatchback, three or five doors: Elegant and user-friendly, dynamic and sporty, it offers a unique blend of comfort and driveability as well as remarkable versatility.
* The Peugeot 207 SW and SW Outdoor: An attractive aesthetic balance, a bright interior and remarkable practicality: all major benefits with, for the Outdoor version, an added taste of adventure.
* The Peugeot 207 CC: Europe’s leading cabriolet, all categories combined, offers an attractive style coupled with the dynamism and safety that are the foundation of its appeal

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2010 Peugeot 608 Rendering and Speculations

Pug_907Here we go again; Peugeot is said to be readying a new flagship sedan dubbed 608 that aims to establish the French carmaker as a major player in the premium mid-size segment that’s besieged by models like the Audi A6, Mercedes-Benz E-Class, and the BMW 5-Series.

We don’t like to jump into conclusions, but judging from the ill-fated Peugeot 607 and about every other proposition from European carmakers besides those from the German troika (aka BMW, Audi and Mercedes-Benz), we fail to see the reason why Peugeot would want to spend money and resources on a project that has failure written all over it. Imagine, not even Alfa Romeo has managed to penetrate this particular segment, let alone a mainstream marque like Peugeot.

We’d find it more reasonable for the French carmaker to spend its time and money on a totally new project –for example a compact SUV/Crossover- than to give the premium mid-size segment another shot.

Peugeot RCZ Coupé gets green light

peugeot308_rcz1_500The Peugeot RCZ first appeared at the 2007 Frankfurt motor show as the 308 RCZ concept – and it stole the show.

Peugeot has not yet revealed a complete picture of the finished car, but we fully expect it to look every bit as dramatic as the original design.

Peugeot describes the RCZ as ‘an exclusive vehicle, full of emotion, aimed at enthusiasts who are particularly discerning with regards to driving enjoyment’.

As a 2+2 coupé, it is expected to rival the Audi TT and Volkswagen Scirocco – though we’ll know more for sure once pricing has been announced.

The transition from concept to reality has taken just two years – an unusually short period of time for the motor industry.

Build quality and driving dynamics have been prioritised, making the timeline even more of a challenge.

Engines and equipment levels are subject to confirmation, but we understand the RCZ will be powered by a highly tuned variant of the 1.6-litre petrol turbo that appears in many existing Peugeot models, as well as in the Mini Cooper S.

This means that buyers should be able to expect in excess of 200bhp, 0-62mph in around seven seconds, and competitive environmental figures.

Powerful diesel engines may be offered as well, perhaps even the new V6 that has just joined the 407 Coupé line-up.

The Peugeot RCZ will go on sale in Spring 2010. It becomes the first Peugeot to deviate from the usual zero and double-zero naming convention.

Peugeot’s Audi TT

peugeot-308-RC-Z-3.previewPeugeot’s Audi TT will be unveiled at Frankfurt motorshow in September. The car will be fitted with a mini cooper JCW 1.6 turbo,possibly tuned to 218 Bhp the Zagota style roof bulges stay, as does the kink alomg the side window line. Peugeot insider said the car has an almopst identical footprint to tt and price will be below 20000 euro. The new generation 2 liter HDI in either 150 or 163 bhp will also be available mated to automatic or manual transmission.

Tone down the 19in alloys, 40-profile rubber and postbox-sized exhausts, and you’re left with how the production car should look.

The feel from inside the industry is that engineering package is for real, though. Peugeot is the latest manufacturer to jump on the lightweight bandwagon (not hard, after years of successive bloaters) and the 308 RC Z weighs 1200kg, not bad for a coupe of this size. However, you have to take with a pinch of salt the claims that the concept has extensive use of aluminium and carbonfibre. It’s highly unlikely the high-tech composites will survive into a £18,000 production coupe.

The 308 RC Z is powered by a 1.6 litre THP turbo-charged petrol engine developed from the EP6DTS engine normally found under the bonnet of the 207 GTi, but now with a maximum power output of 218bhp. According to Peugeot

It is characterised by incredible responsiveness, thanks to the maximum torque output of 206ft-lb produced from very low engine speeds. This can also temporarily be increased to 221ft-lb due to the over boost function.
The engine is coupled with an entirely new 6 speed manual gearbox.

The interior is one of the surest signs that the 308 coupe is a dead cert for production. There is very little in here that’s concept-car pie-in-the-sky. The dashboard architecture is largely taken from the 308 hatch, although the fascia is trimmed in plusher leather.

Large, chunky bucket seats do their best to gobble any available legroom for those in the rear while, in true Peugeot style, the A-pillars are so far forward that you get the impression it could feel like an MPV from the driver’s chair.

Figures quoted are 146mph flat-out and 0-62mph in 7.0sec, which sound credible in light of the claimed kerbweight.

2011 Peugeot RCZ teased before IAA debut

 Peugeot-RCZ-2011

Peugeot-RCZ-2011

 Peugeot-RCZ-2011

Peugeot-RCZ-2011

The magnificent Peugeot RCZ which was unveiled as a concept two years ago at the Frankfurt Motor Show has done transformation into a production car and will make its world debut this September, again in the Frankfurt! The RCZ Coupe is actually a new niche in car design, and is 110 percent different than any other Peugeot you have ever seen! It’s not even named like a normal Peugeot, they always use boring numbers but this one has a cool name, RCZ, sounds like a superbike!

The car is a 2+2 compact coupe and features some unique detailing like the shape of pillarless doors or the double bubble roof. But still you can notice it’s a Peugeot as it maintains Pug’s Feline character. Honestly since 406 Coupe, we haven’t seen any good looking car from the French firm, they even ruined the lovely 206 with the stupid-looking 207! Now RCZ can change things, and make Peugeot to get in touch with its sporty soul once again.
Peugeot says that during these two years engineers were working hard to prepare something good enough to cope with the exciting styling of the RCZ. So let’s hope they come up with something equally amazing, because a terrible engine(a diesel for example!) would ruin the whole car.
After years and years finally Peugeot designed something brilliant which can be proud of, they better be careful not to waste the car’s great potential with a rubbish drivetrain. The RCZ is a modern classic.

2011 Peugeot RCZThe magnificent Peugeot RCZ which was unveiled as a concept two years ago at the Frankfurt Motor Show has done transformation into a production car and will make its world debut this September, again in the Frankfurt! The RCZ Coupe is actually a new niche in car design, and is 110 percent different than any other Peugeot you have ever seen! It’s not even named like a normal Peugeot, they always use boring numbers but this one has a cool name, RCZ, sounds like a superbike!

The car is a 2+2 compact coupe and features some unique detailing like the shape of pillarless doors or the double bubble roof. But still you can notice it’s a Peugeot as it maintains Pug’s Feline character. Honestly since 406 Coupe, we haven’t seen any good looking car from the French firm, they even ruined the lovely 206 with the stupid-looking 207! Now RCZ can change things, and make Peugeot to get in touch with its sporty soul once again.

Peugeot says that during these two years engineers were working hard to prepare something good enough to cope with the exciting styling of the RCZ. So let’s hope they come up with something equally amazing, because a terrible engine(a diesel for example!) would ruin the whole car.

After years and years finally Peugeot designed something brilliant which can be proud of, they better be careful not to waste the car’s great potential with a rubbish drivetrain. The RCZ is a modern classic.

Peugeot 308 CC HDi 136 SE Auto

453361.1-lgSome clarification is required here. The headline says that this car is a 308 CC SE, and so it is, but at the same time it isn’t. Peugeot loaded it with optional extras in the form of red leather trim, a windstop, an airwave scarf (to warm your neck when the roof is down), metallic paint, satellite navigation, Bluetooth connectivity, an electric seat pack and 18″ alloy wheels.

As well as bringing the price up from £23,095 to £26,395, this effectively turned the car into a higher-spec GT, minus only a JBL hi-fi system (which is not available as an option for the SE in this country), tyre pressure sensors and front and rear parking sensors. In that respect the test car was slightly less than a GT – though nearly £2000 more expensive – and yet it was also slightly more in that it had six-speed automatic transmission which you don’t get in the GT. I hope that’s clear.

Of the equipment mentioned so far, the most impressive is perhaps the leather trim, which further enhances the CC’s truly excellent seats and is also fitted to the dashboard and door panels. The least impressive is undoubtedly that 18″ wheel option. Those damn things may look great but they – or rather the low-profile tyres that are fitted to them – make a complete mess of the CC’s road behaviour; they are completely unsuited to the soft and comfortable suspension settings, and they transmit even the most minor road imperfections straight into the cabin. Handling is compromised too, in that the tyres make the car willing to shoot into a corner, while the suspension makes it react to everything that happens from that point onwards in a much more leisurely way.

I drove this car for nearly 2000 miles in less than a week, and there was not one journey on which I did not regret that the 18s had been fitted and feel that they were a waste of £300. The standard 17s would, I’m sure, be much better, and perhaps with 16s the car would be better still, though those are available only on the entry-level Sport.

That was the worst part of the car, though onlookers who didn’t ride in it reserved their criticism for the shape. The long bootlid does indeed make the CC look rather strange, and I think it’s much more pleasant on the eye when the roof is folded away (a quick and easy process which incidentally reduces the boot space from 465 litres to 266 litres, which is in each case less than the Ford Focus CC offers). Personally I’m not a fan of roof-down motoring but the CC seemed pleasant enough in alfresco form, and about as good as – or to me, no worse than – any of its coupé-convertible rivals.

I’m not the world’s greatest enthusiast of automatic transmissions either, but the one in the CC is very good, with particularly smooth changes. There is no paddle-shift system behind the steering wheel as there is on many sporty automatics, but you can choose gears for yourself using the conventional lever, which is well-placed for this sort of thing even though it has clearly been positioned to suit left-hand drive models.

Apart from the jittery ride, my main complaint about driving the car concerns the instruments. In typical current Peugeot fashion they look great, but they’re mostly hidden by the steering wheel, at least when it is set up to suit me, and one of the results is that you have to bend down to see, for example, any speed between a fast trot and a hot lap around Le Mans.

The CC is powered by a choice of 1.6-litre petrol engines (150bhp turbo and 120bhp non-turbo), a 110bhp 1.6 turbo diesel and the 140bhp two-litre diesel tested here. Not all of them are fitted to the Sport and GT models, but the SE gets the full set, and I suspect that the larger diesel is the best of the bunch. It’s not particularly noisy, it has plenty of mid-range poke (without the obvious drama of the 150bhp turbo petrol) and even in automatic form it has a respectable official combined fuel economy figure of just over 40mpg, though of course this is well beaten by the manual version’s 47.9mpg.

Peugeot 407 Coupe

peugeot 407 copue

peugeot 407 copue

A stylish design combining driving exhilaration has long been a key attribute of Peugeot vehicles, and with cars like the Peugeot 407 Coupé, utilises the company’s expertise to the full. Launched in 2005, the Peugeot 407 Coupé is the latest in a long tradition of prestige Coupés produced by Peugeot, where style plays a key role, combining stature and refinement to create a product capable of long-distance touring with comfort and high performance developments.

This stature is expressed initially through the coupé’s suspension dynamics, with dual wishbones and a drop link at the front and multi-arm rear suspension; the Peugeot 407 Coupé produces superb road holding, is acknowledged for its grip, progressive control, dynamism and ride comfort. Stature is also appropriate in terms of the choice of high-performance engines, including a new V6 HDi PEF version at the top of the diesel range that is powerful, flexible and economical.

In keeping with today’s demands, the Peugeot 407 Coupé features a range of engine and transmission choices that ensure that ‘driver involvement’ is aligned more closely with ‘environmental responsibilities’. The new V6 HDi PEF 3.0-litre engine, coupled with a 6-speed sequential automatic gearbox, develops a maximum power output of 177 kW (241 bhp) at 3,800 rpm supplemented by maximum torque of 450 Nm from 1,600 rpm – a value which remains unchanged up to 3,600 rpm.

With this engine, the Peugeot 407 Coupé becomes the most powerful production vehicle ever constructed by Peugeot in its 120 years history as a car manufacturer. The level of performance it produces (80 to 120 kph in 4.7 seconds; 0 to 100kph (62mph) in 7.7 seconds.) is matched by good fuel economy, in comparison to competitors. Compared to the 2.7-litre V6 HDi it replaces, the 3.0-litre reduces fuel consumption by more than 15% (while power is increased by 18%), and a combined cycle rate of 7.2 litres/100 km (39.2MPG) or 189 g/km of CO2 (instead of the 225 g/km previously).

Equipped with the particle emissions filter (PEF) and compliant to Euro 5 standards, this supreme engine technology demonstrates that driving pleasure does not have to come at the expense of compromising fuel consumption and emissions. The 3.0-litre HDi V6 is distinguished on the outside by two oval exhaust pipes, arranged symmetrically on either side of the rear bumper diffuser. The new 2.0-litre HDi PEF 120 kW (163 bhp) at 3,750 rpm is coupled with a 6-speed manual gearbox. With this power and a maximum torque of 340 Nm (constant between 2,000 and 3,000 rpm), this 4 cylinder engine is the perfect counterpart to the V6 HDi PEF and brings genuine appeal for its combined attributes in terms of purchase price, running costs and a top-of-the-range specification.

This new engine, which has 20% more power than the previous 2.0-litre HDi, in the Peugeot 407 Coupé is particularly environmentally-friendly in its category with a fuel consumption of 5.4 litres/100 km (52.3MPG), with 140 g/km of CO2 in the Combined Cycle (a reduction of 8.5%). Benefiting from the arrival of these new engines, the elegant and refined style of the Peugeot 407 Coupé is subtly enhanced by chrome trim spanning the entire upper section of the side windows.

Another development is the door mirrors which are now larger to offer better rear vision, conforming to new legislative standards. Finally, the Coupé’s WIP Com and WIP Nav telematics (accessible satellite navigation and Bluetooth™ hands-free kit) and the all new WIP Bluetooth (option coupled with WIP Sound radio featuring USB connector and hands-free kit) equipment are now available.

In France, the Peugeot 407 Coupé is available in two trim levels (Sport and Féline) and a special series (with Navteq). It is priced as follows: * 33,350 euros for the 2.0-litre HDi PEF 120 kW (163 bhp) * 47,600 euros for the V6 3.0-litre HDi PEF 177 kW (241 bhp)